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Strawberry and Apple Jam


Given how recipes languish in my bookmarks folder for years, this jam made a remarkable journey to actual recipe in less than two weeks. When Shaheen made this gorgeous jam a few days back, I knew I just had to hurry up and get this done. Partly because we are nearing the end of the strawberry season here, but mainly because this was simply way too good looking.

And easy too. Wash and hull a cup and a half of strawberries, then halve them. Mix with 1/4 cup sugar in a heavy bottomed pan. You might need more sugar here, as my strawberries were super sweet. Bring the fruit to a boil on a low heat. Add one small apple, peeled and diced finely. Let the jam boil until it reaches 220F on a candy thermometer. This takes around 20-25 minutes and you would need to keep stirring every once in a while, skimming the foam that collects on top.

Let it cool, then put it in the fridge. Since we aren't canning it, eat within a week. Or, if you are like me, you'd steal spoonfuls of warm jam and won't have much left to go in the fridge. Just don't tell my mom (since this is what I did to all her plum jams when I was a kid)!

Comments

Veggie Hut said…
the colour is awesome..plz give me some for my bread :-)
Laura said…
This sounds wonderful. I love mixing fruits for jam.

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