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Mulberry Nights



It's truly summer when frosty glasses full of ice cubes start showing up around the house. But this drink is super special.

Mulberries are such a rare commodity in Mumbai that I instantly gobble up any that I am able to get. Although they grow in nearby Mahabaleshwar, the fruit is so delicate that half of it gets overripe by the time it reaches the markets. Which is why I am always on the lookout for just-ripe mulberries. And which is why I ended up with a pack of underripe, tangy fruit instead.

So I made a mulberry syrup. Throughly washed a cup of mulberries, then put them in a pan with 3 tbsp caster sugar and 1/4 cup water. Cooked them until the mulberries got just a little mushy. Then, when they cooled down a little, I pureed them in the blender and passed them through a sieve.

To make the actual drink, I put a tbsp of this syrup in a champagne flute, sprinkled some rock salt, filled the glass with ice cubes and topped with plain soda (sparkling water). Now isn't that a gorgeous color to have around on a summer night.

Comments

Looks so tempting, I don't know if I am familiar with this fruit. I will google it now :)
Lovely color to the drink... Looks so good and cool. YUM!
Apu said…
Looks so good Simran!! I just adore mulberries - we had a tree in our garden!!
Prathibha said…
wow...such a refreshing drink simran..I was never impressed wid dis fruit,its very sour...but never attempted this way..I think its one of d best ways to use those berries...the click is very nice...:)
Deepika said…
Believe it or not, I've actually seen mulberry trees around the University Campus here in Philadelphia. The fruits are tiny and oblong rather than the longish kind we get in India. I will definitely try and pick some this year and try your drink!
notyet100 said…
umm will try this sometime,..;-)
Naina said…
Lovely pic! Well captured!!
I love mulberries. We used to have huge trees in the park next to school, and I remember actually eating them off the tree :)

The mulberries here are usually so sour, I've stopped eating them. Making them into a drink, and a gorgeous one at that, is a great idea.
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