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Truly Punjabi by Nature

Back from a trip to Delhi, with just enough time between flights to drop into "Punjabi by Nature" for lunch. It's Punjabi food at its finest, though their most famous (infamous!) menu item is not food. They were the first to introduce vodka golgappa shots - 2 large golgappas filled with pepper vodka and their in-house sweet-n-sour. I've heard of Punjabi by Nature in "vodka golgappas" context for the past several years. However, this is not what I had on my trip there.

I ordered the north Indian staples - Lahori Paneer and butter naan. The waiter stifled my attempts to order a couple of nans with "order just one - it's quite big". Now big is quite an understatement, it's huge, mammoth, gigantic. There were two of us, and we could not finish one naan.

And I felt so full I had to miss out on the other famous thing on their menu I have craved for years, flambed gulab jamuns. Just imagine the drama of it - a large gulab jamum covered with cognac and set on fire. Well, there's always next time!

Comments

Srivalli said…
that really sounds awesome simran...wish I try this sometime...i had similar exp sometime...we ended up packing the other naan!..:)
Bharti said…
I've heard of this restaurant..my friends visited and told me about the famous vodka golgappas!
notyet100 said…
HEARD LOT AOUT THIS PLACE,..STILL TO GO THERE...HPPY JANMASHTAMI,..:-)
Anonymous said…
Hi,

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Blog Editor – SiliconIndia
Reeta Skeeter said…
mommeeeee me is dying for a PBN mean after reading this post... :) glad me is in delhi...
punjabi by nature ka review bhi likhne ka soch rahi thi cafe talkies mein... will link back to you

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