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Bibimbap



This is the reason I love taking part in Taste & Create. There is so much new to learn and try when you meet new partners. This month, I am visiting Kitschow in Vancouver for a course in Asian cooking. She also tries a lot of other cuisines, but wok is her favorite way to cook. I first thought I'd find very little vegetarian choice at her place. But as luck would have it, she has recently done a lot of vegetarian cooking and eating for lent and I had a virtual rainbow to pick from. Everything looked so delicious it was tough to pick one. I picked the one with the cutest name : Bibimbap.

Bibimbap is a Korean rice, usually topped with beef and vegetables but Kitschow made a vegan version for Lent. The recipe has three parts. First you cook the rice. Then, when it's almost done but is still moist, you arrange vegetables on top so it looks colorful and pretty. For the vegan version, Kitschow just put raw veggies there and let them cook in the steam. But I liked the idea of steaming them first. So I chopped all my chosen vegetables - spinach, mushrooms, peppers and babycorn - and microwaved them separately with a tbsp of two of water for a minute.

The third and the most important bit is the dressing. For my 1/2 cup rice, I mixed 2 tbsp chilli soy sauce, a tbsp of vegetable oil, 2 garlic cloves, green bits of a spring onion and 1/2 tbsp toasted sesame seeds. I poured half of this dressing on the rice, then arranged the steamed vegetables on top, added pan fried tofu in the middle and poured the rest of the dressing over. Covered the rice and let it steam for a few minutes. This pretty look is how you take it to the table. Once that's done, you mix it all in and indulge in the best vegetable rice ever.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Hi SImran

I am a new reader of ur blog , & i like ur blog as well it has that no fuss free attitutude of writng wich is a nice change. I am also planning to try out some of ur cookies recipe. i just wanted to check a thing , when u bake cookies , do u place them directly on the baking pan or u place a butter paper or parchment paper , do let me know. i am quiet new to baking so this question.
Unknown said…
Pinky - I put my cookies directly on the baking sheet. You can try that with a small batch, and use the paper only if your cookies stick (although it's unlikely with something that has so much butter).
notyet100 said…
mmmm,...this looks yum,.//:-)
Biswajit said…
sounds delicious. can i send my cook over to you for training?
Pooh said…
This is so weird! I just asked a Korean friend for the recipe last week. I'll have to return to yours when I decide to make this and compare notes.
Bindiya said…
Simran this looks really easy, yummy and healthy to boot, will try it out asap!
Pavani said…
I love taste & create too, new blogs to explore and try new food. Bibimbap looks delicious. I made it for A.W.E.D and I really liked it, especially the sauce.
Unknown said…
This looks yum!!And its super healthy :)
KC said…
Hi Simran:

This looks perfect! I was afraid people would think steaming each veg too much trouble so I offered a simplified version. Glad you decided to steam.

I really enjoyed your blog and am glad Nicole paired us. I will visit you often.
Laura said…
Somehow I totally forgot to sign up for T&C this month which really bums me out, esp since I'll be gone most of May. ANyway I LOVE bibimbap and this looks fabulous!
Bharti said…
I like this. looks and sounds really good. The garlic in the dressing must have made it really flavorful. And yes, the name is really cute!
This comment has been removed by the author.
Simran...I am not able to pronounce javascript:void(0)it dear..he he :)
Nice try looks yummy ..hey gimme ur mail id n phone number, u can send it to
thechefandherkitchen@gmail.com

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