Skip to main content

Sago Pops for the Indian Cooking Challenge


You don't need to remind me that Srivalli had chosen Murukus as the challenge recipe this month. That was my intention too when I soaked sago in buttermilk this morning. Srivalli said to soak it for 3 hours; I figured I would leave it in the fridge and deal with it when I come back in the evening. Bad decision! The sago never got too soft; a condition our host had warned us against. She said sago will splutter and it wont be a pretty sight.

Now I had kept this to the last minute and today being the deadline, I went ahead anyway. Ground the bhuna chana dal to a powder, mixed it with rice flour, besan, salt and chilli powder. Poured over some oil, then added the sago and buttermilk. The sago wasn't soft enough; I should have stopped then. But I plodded on.

I don't have a muruku maker so I tried pushing the dough through my pastry bag. It was too stiff to agree with my ideas, so I decided to hand roll the dough into sticks. See, I can be pretty crafty sometime. Then I dropped a handful of these sticks into hot oil. Nothing happened for a minute, then the sago started to burst and there was hot oil flying all over the kitchen. When the popping stopped, I stepped out of my hiding place and took the sago sticks out. They were sooooo delicious!

So popping or not, I was going ahead with this. By the third batch, I had it down to a fine art. Drop the sticks in enough oil to drown them so there's no need to turn anything, then run for dear life. Once the dreary popping sounds stop, go collect your heavenly sago pops.

The only flip side is; my kitchen looks like a battlefield and I think I will never get the oil off the stove. But that's something for my maid to deal with tomorrow!

Comments

Srivalli said…
Looks fabulous Simmy..hheheh
BangaloreBaker said…
Thank God that you have a maid. I would be spending lot of time cleaning if I had this problem. My sago never got soft so I microwaved them to make it soft. Another trick is if they start bursting, cover it with a lid that has a handle (preferably glass so that you can see through) and remove when the spluttering stops. Lot of times when we make sheedai, it happens like that and it is better to be prepared with a plate to cover. I had a hearty laugh when I read your post.
Srimathi said…
Oh Lord! simran, I have had such episodes with the cheedai's and its not very encouraging when these things happen.As BB mentioned I would hate to do the clean up.
Madhu said…
Ah...Sago firework story, Gald you got some help cleaning up.
Lebouffe said…
This is fun!! I can imagine the mess and running around.. haahaa :)
Khaugiri said…
Ye to bina mausam ke Diwali ho gayi:)
Jayasri said…
I had no problems with my sago murukku!!, only when I did my Athirasams!!, the best part I loved in yours was piping them :), what a delightful idea!!, but definitely a struggle for you, you should have left it out, actually my recipe which my friend taught me was with using sour curds, and your sago would have been great left it out!!!.., yours is the best creative murukku I have ever seen!!, hats of to your thinking of using a piping bag!!, don't get offended please, I was just thinking what I would have done if I did not have a muruku maker!!,
Swathi said…
simran,

I Liked your pops, for me there is no poping problem, only pressing problem, too hard to press through the nozzle of muruku presser.
Anonymous said…
nice pops Simran!
Nisha said…
Wow your muruku looks so different
simply.food said…
A very innovative muruku. I applaud your resilience to carry on with the challenge come what may.:0 good effort.My 1st visit here following your blog.
Hehehe I love how you made these!! Can totally imagine you running about :P

Popular posts from this blog

Farm to Fork in Chail

Back in 19th century, when Shimla was the summer capital of India, the Maharaja of Patiala got the British rulers riled over his dalliances and got banned from entering the city. Not the one to be put down so easily, he found a tiny little town about an hour from Shimla and made Chail his very own summer capital. Today, Chail still has the impressive Palace that the Maharaja built and the highest cricket ground in the world. There really isn't much more to the city apart from a small local market and a couple of hotels that get spillover crowd from Shimla in the summers. It's a pleasant little diversion but that's not why I went to Chail. I stopped nine kilometers short of the town to make Ekam my home for a weekend.

Sumeet Singal built this house on a cliff as his own weekend home. Today, even when Ekam is open as a luxury boutique resort, the cosy homely feeling remains intact. I asked Sumeet what there was to do during my three day holiday at Ekam. He told me that ther…

Mystery Fruit

This only happened a few times every year, just when the rainy season kicked in. A street hawker will come by, straw basket on head. He will yell "kaul chapni" and I will run out to buy a bundle of these. Stuck together like flowers, they looked like a bouquet. Every hole contains a little fruit. You break out the package, peel the tiny fruit that pops out and eat it. Done slowly, it can take you an hour to eat an head. Or did, when I was about 12 years old.

That was the last time I saw this fruit. I've never seen it again, didn't even know what it was called or where it came from. Three weeks back, Vikram Doctor wrote about a store in Khar that sells Sindhi foods. He described this fruit and I knew it came from my vivid childhood memories. And finally, I knew we were talking about lotus fruit.

Now talk about coincidences. Last weekend, I was passing by a lane in Bandra and for the first time in many, many years I saw the straw basket filled with my mytery fruit. It…

Of Brun and Bun Maska

There is more to Bombay's breads than the pao that goes into pao bhaji and vada pao. There's Brun. and there's bun. We will get there. First, you have to get to know the city's Parsis. And Iranis, who are also Zoroastrians, but came to city a little later, in the late 19th or early 20th century. And when they came, they brought with them these little cafes that dot the city.

I am no expert on Irani chai cafes. And I can't tell you whether Yazdani Bakery will provide you the best experience or Kyani's. But I can tell you a few things you need to ignore when you get there. Appearances don't matter; so ignore the fact that the marble/glass top tables and the wooden chairs look a bit dilapidated. Also ignore the rundown look the place sports.

Instead, get yourself settled. And order a bun muska. This one's familiar to you as a first cousin of the soft hamburger bun. It's similar, but just a tad bit sweeter. Maska, of course, is the generous dollop of b…