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Did you come hear after reading about moong dal halwa for this month's Indian Cooking Challenge? After all, we picked my mother's recipe and it's natural for you to wonder how the original tastes like. And I did have every intention of making it, until about three days ago. Then I thought; no matter what I do, it's never gonna taste like what mom makes. So why bother.

Instead, I have a focaccia to share. Many years ago, when I first started baking, focaccia was the first bread I tried. I didn't know then of bad quality yeasts, and varying rising times so what I ended up with was a focaccia brick. This time around, I referred to those fine folks at King Arthur Flour whose recipes have never failed me.

As you can see, I omitted the olive oil on top and the mandatory sprinkle of rosemary to come up with my low fat version. It was delicious nevertheless. Looks like there's nothing you can do to mess up this crunchy yet light bread. Once you're done eating the halwa, try this one out!

Comments

CurryLeaf said…
Yum,its great. I too had seen the KAF golden focaccia.
notyet100 said…
looks delicious,..
lata raja said…
Hey Simran, I came looking for halwa to reassure myself that mine had turned out fine and you give us this feast? Wow!Looks great!
Medhaa said…
Hey Simran, I know how you feel, moms will always taste best. Please thank you mother for the recipe it was delicious
Keri said…
Fabulous blog food here. Facoccia is one of my favorite things. You do nice work. Keri (a.k.a. Sam)
Unknown said…
I was looking for the halwa wen I found your title! Thanks for the recipe Simran!
Desisoccermom said…
Aha! so you are responsible for the halwa mania on blogosphere. But I have to agree with you, I have grown up eating moong dal halwa, being from North and all that, but I have and will never make it at home. Mom's or in my case the halwai's is the best.
Enjoying the focacia myself. :)
Srivalli said…
Hey I came here thinking abt it..and you say this..I told you na??..anyway facaccia looks delish!

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