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30 Days of Christmas: Beetroot Salad



So here we are, on the last day of this 30 day blogging marathon. Wasn't it a fun ride - with so much butter and sugar and raisins. I've taken on several challenges since I started this blog but this one - with a full month of daily blogging - was the most challenging so far, And to wrap up a whole month of treats, I bring you a salad that's worthy to be called a treat itself, a seamless way to transition to healthier eating now that the holidays are over.

I first ate this salad at the London restaurant called Bob Bob Ricard. While beets, goat cheese and greens are always a classic combination, it was the presentation that attracted me to this salad and have kept it on the 'top dishes I've eaten' list that I maintain in my head. I've wanted to recreate this salad ever since and today seemed to be a great day for it.

The salad comes in four parts. Goat cheese, that gets sandwiched between thin slices of pickled beetroot. Arugula or your choice of greens (Bob Bob Ricard uses pea shoots) dressed in salt and balsamic vinegar. And although you can't see it, a layer of minty broadbeans hidden under the leaves.

Start with the pickled beetroot the day before you want to make this salad. Peel a beetroot and cut it into thin slices with a mandolin, your food processor or a sharp knife. Mix 1 cup water with 1 tbsp lime juice. Add 1/2 tsp salt and stir until the salt dissolves completely. Add the beetroot slices to the liquid, cover and leave in the fridge at least overnight. If you have fresh shelling beans, you are done for the day but if you plan to use dried beans, soak them overnight as well.

The next day, cook shelled broadbeans in plenty of salted water until very soft. Drain and mix with chopped mint leaves, salt, pepper and lime juice. Put about 2 tbsp of cooked beans in the centre of your plate. Drain the beetroot slices and arrange 3-4 of them around the broadbeans. Add a dollop of goat cheese on eat beetroot slice and top with another slice of beetroot. Separately, wash the arugula leave and roughly tear any large leaves. Add salt and balsamic vinegar to the leaves, then arrange them over the beans and the beetroot. Drizzle some more balsamic on the plate. Your salad is now good to go.

And that's it for our Christmas series, ladies and gentlemen. It's a wrap!

Comments

Srivalli said…
Wow I caught up with your Christmas Marathon Simran..very enlighting to read some of the recipes..good job girl!

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