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On breakfast buffets and bear hugs

Now there's nothing to beat the kick you get out of a great meal first thing in the morning. And the breakfast at Vista set me thinking about what would constitute the “best breakfast buffet” for me.

The essential part of the buffet is that is should have a lot of variety. But then, all the parts should add up. So here’s what to add and what to leave out of my perfect breakfast buffet.

The Must-haves

1.Fruits – lots of them and as many varieties as possible. And those flavored yogurts you get to pour over your fruits.
2. A range of sweet breads. I usually go with the chocolate/cinnamon roll or a muffin
3. Even better – warm pancakes and/or waffles with maple syrup
4. Then it’s over to the savory and hot section. Idlis/vadas are usually my first choice out of the buffet.
5. Its an egg-white omelet next with baked potatoes/hash browns. Somehow, on these occassions, I don't feel the breakfast's complete without eggs
6. Croissant to go with the eggs; even better if you find me a New York bagel
7. Coffee to end the great meal. Sometimes, every once in a while, I would go for the Masala Chai instead.

Take it or leave it!

1. Juices and milk shakes
2. Cereals – even if there’s variety, this is something I eat at home every other day
3. Plain toast – simply boring!
4. Baked beans and baked tomatoes – I can’t stand either!

And now, before I sign off...a thank you to Sunshinemom for her giant bear hug.



I would like to pass on this jaadu ki jhappi to:

The bubbly Swati from Chatkhor, and

The immensly friendly Srivalli from Cooking4allseasons

And a virtual hug back to Sunshinemom :)

Comments

Sunshinemom said…
That's a mouthwatering list, Simran - Who wouldn't want it (Without the eggs for me:))! Thanks for the hug and Congrats:)
Andhra Flavors said…
congrates on ur awards.
SMN said…
The mouthwatering list and i wont take eggs offcourse..and congrats on the award
Simran said…
Thanks everyone!
Srivalli said…
Simran...thats a nice one...and thanks so much for thinking of me..I am so glad for the hug!!..

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