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It's raining, again

This has been a strange year for rains. The monsoons arrived late, threw a few tantrums and then dried up. Now, after a few dry weeks, we are most likely getting the last rains of the year.

The only thing I ever feel like eating when it rains are pakoras and chai. Vegetables, most likely onions and potatoes but sometimes paneer, dipped in a gramflour batter and deep fried. Warm and crisp - the most perfect antidote to grey skies there is.



There's another reason I'm making paneer pakoras today. We have a family tradition - it's always cakes and paneer pakoras for birthdays. Always, ever since I was a really small kid. You can add to this menu if it's a bigger party, but these two are must have for a very special birthday today.

Happy Birthday, Papa! You are the best father in the world.

Comments

Vaishali said…
Simran, indeed what can be better on a rainy day than a plate of crispy pakoras and a hot cup of chai? Absolute bliss.
Usha said…
I love the combination of hot pakoras and tea almost anytime,but especially when it rains...
Rachel said…
I'd love that ona rainy day as well...pakoras and cake for a birthday :D
anudivya said…
Paneer pakoras... surprisingly I have not tasted it... Will try it out, on a rainy day ;)
notyet100 said…
pakoras,..look yum,..enjoy rain,..;-),.paneer pakodas remind meof lajpatnagar in delhi,..thers one shop famous for paneer pakodas and lassi..hppy bloggin ..
bombay ki barish... garma garam pakode.... and woh bhi paneer wale... waah ... happpy budday uncle... :)
Shri said…
never tried pakoras with paneer,good try.will try it soon.
Bharti said…
It's raining here in Chicago too, and I was thinking exactly the same thing- pakoras and chai. Only I'm too lazy to make it. Paneer pakodas sound like a fun tradition. Happy birthday to ur dad!
Unknown said…
Thanks everyone for your wishes. Passed them on to papa, and he says thanks too!
Sunshinemom said…
Unexpected rains - I got drenched thoroughly again!! Mazaa aaya:) Pakode dekhkar aur bhi mazaa aa gayaa!

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