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Parantha Time

It's amazing how traditions are made. Take this one for example. For the past many years, we eat gobhi paranthas on diwali night. I think it first started because we were a bit tired of all the sweets, dry fruits and chocolates that are gifted you on diwali day. And it was 11 pm, that time after the festivities are over. You're done with lakshmi puja, have lighted up the rather huge house with electric lights, diyas and candles, bursted tons of crackers and then you don't know what else to do. So the crisp pan-fried gobhi paranthas just sounded perfect. And continue to sound perfect many years later. We had gobhi parathas once again last night after the excitement of the festival.

To make gobhi paranthas, make a smooth, elastic but not too soft a dough with whole wheat flour and water. Grate cauliflower florets. Add salt, garam masala, red chilli powder, ajwain (carom seeds) and some chopped coriander leaves. Mix, then squeeze the mixture between palms to drain out any excess water. Take a lemon sized ball of dough and roll it a bit thickly. Place 2 tbsp of cauliflower mixture in the middle and gather the flour on top to seal and form a flattish dough ball. Roll out as thin as you can. Place on a heated tawa (flat pan) and let cook for a minute. Flip, apply ghee on both sides and shallow fry until crisp and brown. Serve immediately with butter.

A fitting end to the lovliest festival of the year. Hope you also had a great diwali!

Comments

Bharti said…
Sounds like a lovely tradition. I know I'm craving soemthing spicy after stuffing my face with the mithais!
Sujatha said…
Thats an interesting tradition.. I totally agree to have something spicy after overloading my tastebuds with sweets.. :)
Rachel said…
that is a nice read...am yet to make a near perfect paratha!!!
Biswajit said…
gobhi parantha - the food of gods...at least north indian gods.

i have trekked up the hills of Vaishnodevi (in Jammu) three times, to taste the Gobhi Parantha they sell at a dingy little shop at the top.

heaven!
Unknown said…
For me, heaven's mom's paranthas - I still can't make anything half as good as hers

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