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Egg Sandwich gets Healthy

There is a story behind this sandwich. After being told a few hundred times that they are full and can't give me a reservation, I've given up on trying to eat at Moshe's. Then, last weekend, it was one of those rare occasions when I went downtown. And inside Kala Ghoda's Fab India store, there was Moshe's cafe. It was small and quaint, with Moshe's trademark sandwiches, salads and by now famous blueberry cheesecake. I had a bit of this and that, but there's more. For along the walls of this cafe, there were shelves of breads and dips and what not - everything, they told me, I could take home. So I brought home lavash and bagels and hummus and that's how this sandwich began.



Slice the wholewheat bagel into two, then toast both sides. Spread a thin layer on hummus on both sides. Chop one hard boiled egg white into small pieces and spread on the bagel. Add some chopped cilantro, sprinkle sea salt and fresh ground pepper then top with the other hummus encrusted slice of bagel. Delicious!

And just contrast this with your regular egg sandwich : white bread, mayonnaise (fats), mustard sauce (more fats!). This version has none of this, but has all the goodness of a flavorful sandwich. Try it, I bet you'd become a fan too.

Comments

Curry Leaf said…
Now thats a healthy sandwich.I think your resolution is to eat homely and healthy this year.Lovely
Simran said…
That's my resolution every year. Let's see how long it lasts this time :)
Alka said…
Oh u Visited Moshe's and even didn't invited us??Not fair huh
And hey the sandwich sounds so simple but still bursting with flavors,wish i could find such EXOTIC stuff in nooks and corners of streets here ..sigh....
Soma said…
I love hummus, add it to anything & it tastes fabulous. Of course its healthy:-)
Priti said…
Nice..looks gud and the idea is great..no fat...all in I guess ;)
notyet100 said…
now i hve to search for bagel,..:-)gonn try this soon,

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