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Can You Keep A Secret

Have you ever had the urge to start blabbering to the person sitting next to you on a plane, knowing you will never meet them again and can say what you want. That's what Emma did, our heroine of Can You Keep A Secret, the book club's pick for the month. Only her blabbering came to haunt her the next day when the possessor of all her secrets turned out to be her big-shot boss.

From this opening, the book quickly goes on to become another romance but is funny enough to keep you reading. Sophie Kinsella is my favorite among the authors of the chic-lit genre that came into being a few years ago. Though not as well written as her Undomestic Goddess or as addictive as her Shopoholic series, Can You Keep A Secret is a great read for a lazy sunday.

Foodwise, this month's book had thin pickings for the members of "This Book Makes Me Cook". But I got my inspiration early on when Emma goes for her "perfect" date with the guy in the plane. And our hero makes champagne magically appear, not knowing that Emma had her heart set on a pink cocktail.





Emma says later on, when she does get to drink her pink cocktail, that it tasted of watermelon. And a watermelon daiquiri or margarita it should have been. But I had my heart set on a pina colada. And so, I made a pink pina colada instead.

All you do is blend 5-6 frozen strawberries with 50 ml coconut milk and 100 ml pineapple juice. Although I didn't, you could throw in 30 ml white rum if you wanted. And some sugar syrup, which I didn't because my juice was sweetened.

Wondering what the rest of the book club came up with.
Aparna made a 5 minute chocolate cake.
Bhagyashri made Shortbread Triangles.
Sweatha made Cheddar Cheese Crisps.
PJ, our new member, made Suralichi Wadi.
Jayasri, another new member this month, made Mango Smoothie.

Next month, we are reading the story of our favorite chef and our favorite blogger. If you would like to read "Julie & Julia" with us, please leave a comment here and I will get back to you with details.

Comments

Curry Leaf said…
Its the best thing Simran,late but never the least and PERFECT for summer.Love the pink pina colada Its in the list of drinks that I had bookmarked for summer.
Aparna said…
And I had 6 starwberries left in the fridge, but this post wasn't up. So I made a milkshake with them and some ice-cream.

Perfect for our prevailing summer temperatures.
notyet100 said…
this looks so refreshing,..
Srimathi said…
Hi Simran, I have not got to reading the book yet. Just going past flu in the family. Will read and post a little late. I hope that is ok. The strawberry shake looks good.
jayasri said…
Love the pina colada, perfect for Indian summer, dad said it is shooting up!!, I wanted to make strawberry daiquiris!!, then my daughter said you can't make it mum it has alcohol in it!!, we can't drink it!!, bless her, so I made Mango smoothie :), thanks simran for this lovely opportunity

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